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Spices & Herbs DictionarySpices & Herbs Dictionary
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A spice is a dried seed, fruit, root, bark, or vegetative substance used in nutritionally insignificant quantities as a food additive for flavor, color, or as a preservative that kills harmful bacteria or prevents their growth. In the kitchen, spices are distinguished from herbs, which are leafy, green plant parts used for flavoring.

A spice may be available in several forms: fresh, whole dried, or pre-ground dried. Generally, spices are dried. A whole dried spice has the longest shelf life so can be purchased and stored in larger amounts, making it cheaper on a per-serving basis. Some spices are rarely available either fresh or whole, for example turmeric, and must be purchased in ground form. Small seeds, such as fennel and mustard seeds, are used both whole and in powder form.

The shelf life of a whole spice is roughly two years. The shelf life of a ground spice roughly six months. For more information about italiancook.ca, please fill out our Contact Us online form. ♥ The Italian Cook

Spices & Herbs List

Pasta Sauce Recipes Pasta Sauce Recipes Pasta Sauce Recipes

Pimento, Pepe di Giamaica - AllSpice

 

Pimento, Pepe di Giamaica - AllSpice

Pimento, Pepe di Giamaica - AllSpice Allspice the dried berry of an evergreen tree native to Central and South America has a flavor and aroma reminiscent of cinnamon cloves and nutmeg. Allspice is sometimes called Pimento berries. Allspice has a variety of uses including pickling cakes and other sweet goods chutneys and rice dishes. It is one of the flavoring ingredients in "Jerk" spice blends and marinades. Allspice became known in Europe long after its was first discovered by an expedition of Columbus; because of the shape (similar to pepper corns), the new grains were termed "pepper" (whether by mistake or to gain more publicity I do not know). Its origin Jamaica, which is also the main exporter. Several other Central American states (e.g, México, Honduras) produce this spice, but their quality is considered inferior. The fruits of P. racemosa, a closely related species, are sometimes used to adulterate allspice.

Anise Seed

 

Anise Seed

Anise SeedAnise seed has been used for centuries for both seasoning and medicinal purposes. It is also used in making liqueurs. Anise seed is used in baking to flavor breads cakes and candies. The mild licorice flavor of anise seed also goes well with fish. Europeans use Anise seed in cakes, cookies, and sweet breads. In the Middle East and India, it is used in soups and stews. Its licoricelike flavour is popular in candies and Anise oil is used in liqueurs. Give fish and shellfish a wonderful Mediterranean flavour by adding Anise Seed to seafood stews. Make a quick sauce for grilled fish by combining melted butter, toasted Anise Seed, lemon juice, and minced green onion.

Arrowroot

 

Arrowroot

ArrowrootArrowroot is the powdered root of a long-leafed perennial grown in Central and South America. It is used to thicken sauces and gravies.It is similar in use to cornstarch but it works better at cooler temperatures and is clearer and less gritty than cornstarch.Use 2-3 tsp.per cup liquid. Arrowroot is used as an article of diet in the form of biscuits, puddings, jellies, cakes, hot sauces, etc., and also with beef tea, milk or veal broth, noodles in Korean and Vietnamese cuisine. With today's greater understanding of its limited nutritional properties, it is no longer used in this way. Arrowroot makes clear, shimmering fruit gels and prevents ice crystals from forming in homemade ice cream. It is invaluable in cooking when you wish to have a clear, thickened sauce, for example, a fruit sauce. It will not make the sauce go cloudy, as for example will cornstarch, flour or other starchy thickening agents. The lack of gluten in arrowroot flour makes it useful as a replacement for wheat flour in baking. Like other pure starches, however, arrowroot is almost pure carbohydrate and devoid of protein, thus it does not equal wheat flour nutritionally. Arrowroot thickens at a lower temperature than does flour or cornstarch, is not weakened by acidic ingredients, has a more neutral taste, and is not affected by freezing. It doesn't mix well with dairy, forming a slimy mixture. It is recommended to mix arrowroot with a cool liquid before adding to a hot fluid.

Basil Sweet

 

Basil Sweet

Sweet BasilOne of over 40 varieties of basil, the common culinary variety also known as sweet basil) boasts the best flavor. Basil should be added to hot dishes just before serving, otherwise it tends to lose its flavor. Basil is a wonderfully versatile herb. It has a special affinity with tomatoes, but is also delicious in egg dishes, with mediterranean vegetables eggplant and zucchini) and in Italian dishes. Basil tastes great in tomato and pasta dishes but it is also gives a sweetscented, minty aroma when crumbled over baked chicken, lamb, or fish. It blends well with garlic, thyme, and oregano.

Bay Leaves

 

Bay Leaves

Bay Leaves The bay tree, native to the Mediterranean, is a small, shrublike evergreen with aromatic leaves. Dried bay is available whole to flavor soups and stews) or ground for stocks and marinades). Bay leaves are used primarily to flavor soups and stews, especially fish stews and gumbo. The flavor of bay is subtle, but helps blend other herb/spice flavors. We stock both Turkish and California whole bay leaves. California leaves are a beautiful, deep green color and of uniform size, making them perfect for crafts. The flavor, however, is about the same as the Turkish, so for cooking, stick with the Turkish.

Caraway Seed

 

Caraway Seed

Caraway Seed The caraway plant is a biennial which grows wild all over Europe and as far East as India, although most of the commercial crop comes from the Netherlands. It has a slightly bitter licorice like flavor.Caraway seeds are used in a variety of foods, including breads and cakes, cheeses and cheese dishes, and in many Hungarian recipes. It is often used in pork and sausage recipes.

Cardamom

 

Cardamom

Cardamom Cardamom is the seed pods of a perennial which is native to India. The plant, related to ginger, produces green seed pods with small dark seeds inside. Cardamom has a unique, strong, almost lemony flavor and aroma. Cardamom is used in flavoring some baked goods, in curries and Indian cuisine and in pickling spices. It can even be used in small amounts to flavor coffee, muffins and other baked goods. In India Cardamom is traditionally used in curry blends, and in Scandinavian countries it is commonly added to breads; however, most of the world's Cardamom crop is used in Arabic countries as a flavouring for coffee.

Cayenne Pepper

 

Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne PepperUse this and all chile pepper products with caution. Use ground Jalapeno to add heat and color to many dishes, including soups, dressings and marinades. Cream of tartar is found in some baking powder, and is often used to help stabilize egg whites, or to produce creamy frostings and candy. If a cook is out of baking powder, he can substitute cream of tartar and baking soda, carefully, to mimic the action of baking powder, which is actually formed from these two compounds. However, homemade baking powder can pack a kick, so it should be substituted with great care. This is how most cooks made their baking powder before it became commercially available.

Cellery Seed

 

Cellery Seed

Cellery SeedThese dried seeds of the celery plant are still popular as a seasoning. Celery seed can be bitter if used to excess. Add equal parts ground celery seed and salt to make your own celery salt. Celery seed is a versatile spice that is particularly suited to fish. It is the base of many seafood seasonings but is also good on vegetables, in soups and stews and to flavor tomato juice. Try a teaspoon in your favorite BBQ sauce!

Chervil

 

Chervil

Chervil Used primarily in France, chervil is often overlooked in the United States. It combines well with saffron and tarragon. Due to its delicate flavor, chervil should be added at the last moment and in quantity. Chervil is similar to parsley in use. It has a delicate flavor that is well suited to eggs but may also be used in soups, salads and sauces.

Chives

 

Chives

Chives Chives are grown for their leaves, which are used for culinary purposes as flavoring herb, and provide a somewhat milder flavour than those of its neighbouring Allium species. Chives have a wide variety of culinary uses, such as in traditional dishes in France and Sweden, among others. Chives are used with pancakes, soups, fish and sandwiches. It is also an ingredient of the gräddfil sauce served with the traditional herring dish served at Swedish midsummer celebrations. The flowers may also be used to garnish dishes. In Poland chives are served with quark cheese. Chives are one of the "fines herbes" of French cuisine, which also include tarragon, chervil and/or parsley. Chives can be found fresh at most markets year-round, making it a readily available herb; it can also be dry-frozen without much impairment to its taste, giving home growers the opportunity to store large quantities harvested from their own garden.

Cilantro

 

Cilantro

Cilantro Cilantro is the leaves of the plant which produces coriander seed. It has a fresh, almost minty flavor that is quite unlike any other herb. Use cilantro in vegetable dishes, with fish and meat, or as a garnish. Cilantro is also popular in salsas and chutneys and is quite common in Mexican dishes.

Cinnamon

 

Cinnamon

Cinnamon Cinnamon is the bark of an evergreen bush native to Sri Lanka. The bark is peeled away from the bush in thin strips, dried, and ground. Our cinnamon in the Kolintji "A" variety with an oil content of about 3%. Cinnamon is a very versatile spice, used in many varieties of dishes. Cinnamon is most popular is sweet dishes, but is also an ingredient in curry powder.

Cloves

 

Cloves

Cloves Allspice the dried berry of an evergreen tree native to Central and South America has a flavor and aroma reminiscent of cinnamon cloves and nutmeg. Allspice is sometimes called Pimento berries. Allspice has a variety of uses including pickling cakes and other sweet goods chutneys and rice dishes. It is one of the flavoring ingredients in "Jerk" spice blends and marinades.

Coriander

 

Coriander

CorianderCoriander is the seeds from the plant that produces Cilantro leaves. The flavor of coriander blends well with that of cumin. For sweet potato fries, toss 1 TBSP ground coriander, 1 TBSP ground cumin, 2 TBSP oil and 2 large sweet potatoes, cut into strips. Bake at 350 degrees. Coriander is used in pickling and in sausage making, as well as with fish and in breads. Coriander is also an essential spice in curry powder. It has a sweet and slightly citrus flavor.

Cream of Tartar

 

Cream of Tartar

Cream of TartarCream of Tartar is the powdery white residue left on the sides of wine aging barrels. Cream of tartar is found in some baking powder, and is often used to help stabilize egg whites, or to produce creamy frostings and candy. If a cook is out of baking powder, he can substitute cream of tartar and baking soda, carefully, to mimic the action of baking powder, which is actually formed from these two compounds. However, homemade baking powder can pack a kick, so it should be substituted with great care. This is how most cooks made their baking powder before it became commercially available.

Cumin

 

Cumin

CuminCumin seeds are produced by a delicate annual which grows only in hot climates. It is an extremely pungent spice that should be used with care as it tends to dominate any dish that uses it. Whole cumin seeds are often roasted just before grinding to bring out the flavor. Cumin is an ingredient in curry powder and is also popular in Spanish and Mexican cooking. Add to tomato dishes, chili, salsa and in many Indian dishes

Curry Powder

 

Curry Powder

Curry PowderCurry Powder is a blend of many spices and is used widely in savory dishes throughout India and Southeast Asia. Curry has a particular scent and is spicy. Add to chicken for flavour. For a quick dip to complement fruit and vegetable sticks, blend sour cream or yogurt with Curry Powder, marmalade, and thyme. Try adding Curry Powder to deviled eggs and egg salads. You can easily make a marinade for chicken or lamb with Curry Powder, yogurt, lime or lemon juice, and garlic. Make curry mayonnaise simply by mixing curry powder and Mayo.

Dill

 

Dill

Dill Dill weed and dill seed, from the same plant, are popular seasonings. Although the flavor is similar, dill seed is stronger and is therefore used in pickles and other strong-flavored dishes. Dill weed, which is more delicate, is used as a more subtle seasoning. Dill weed is popular in dressings, as a garnish for sauces and on vegetables, especially potatoes. It blends well with lemon and is great on fish.

Fennel Seed

 

Fennel Seed

Fennel SeedFennel, harvested from the sweet fennel herb, is used all over the world for both medicinal and seasoning. Fennel has a mild licorice flavor and aroma. Fennel seeds are popular in many sausage recipes, especially for Italian sausage. They are also used in baking, some curry recipes, and in some fruit dishes. Toasting Fennel Seeds accentuates their flavour. Fennel Seed added to meatballs or meat loaf gives an authentic Italian flavour. Sauté Fennel Seed with sliced peppers, onion, and sausage for a quick pasta sauce.

Garlic

 

Garlic

GarlicOne of the most popular seasonings of all time, garlic is used in almost every type of dish. Granulated or powdered garlic is useful for flavoring soups, sauces, meats and vegetables or for garlic bread. Although much of the garlic available is imported, we buy only California grown garlic. It is slightly more expensive, but the extra flavor and aroma more than make up for the extra expense. Use granulated or powdered garlic for instant flavor, or use minced or chopped garlic in slow-cooking soups and stews. Please note: the garlic powder listed here is an extra-fine grind, almost like talcum powder. The granulated is a free-flowing grind which has the consistency of salt or sugar. Supermarket garlic powder is usually what we call granulated

Ginger

 

Ginger

GingerGinger is the root of the orchid-like ginger plant. It is available ground, for baking and curry recipes, or in pieces for seafood boil spices and for pickling. Crystallized ginger is fresh ginger slightly dried in a sugar syrup solution. It may be added to chutneys, or eaten plain. Try dipping crystallized ginger in melted chocolate. Ginger has a slightly biting and hot note. Its aroma is rich, sweet, warm, and woody. Can also be used for adding in gingerbread, ginger ale, gingersnaps, and Asian dishes.

Horseradish

 

Horseradish

HorseradishHorseradish is a thick, brown root that is grated and used fresh or prepared. It is very pungent with a sharp, biting flavor that tends to fade with age or when cooked or added to hot dishes. Horseradish powder is a versatile seasoning that can be used in a variety of ways. It is especially good sprinkled on beef, added to mayonnaise or mustard, or to flavor ham and sausage dishes. Add Horseradish to dressings, mayonnaise, and other condiments for zippier salads, sandwiches and dips. Blend Horseradish into tomatobased cocktail sauce for a seafood or barbecue sauce for grilled meat

Juniper Berries

 

Juniper Berries

Juniper BerriesJuniper berries are grown and used primarily in Mediterranean Europe. Before using, juniper berries should be crushed to bring out their flavor and aroma. Juniper berries are used in many meat dishes and stews, but have a particular affinity with wild game, especially venison. They are also a common ingredient in sauerkraut. Juniper Berries are used in Northern Europe and the United States in marinades, roast pork, and sauerkraut. They enhance meat, stuffings, sausages, stews, and soups.

Mace

 

Mace

Mace Mace comes from the nutmeg tree which is native to Indonesia and Grenada. Mace surrounds and protects the nutmeg, which is the inner kernel of the apricot-type fruit of this tree. Mace is the scarlet colored aril seed covering) of the nutmeg. Although from the same plant, nutmeg and mace have similar but distinctly different flavors. Mace can be used much the same as nutmeg; it has a more delicate, refined flavor. Mace is also popular used whole to infuse the flavor into soups and sauces, then strained out.

Marjoram

 

Marjoram

MarjoramMarjoram is a member of the mint family, related to basil. The flavor of marjoram blends well with thyme. It should be added near the end of cooking as it tends to lose flavor over heat. Marjoram is used in many Mediterranean dishes, including meats and poultry, stuffings, sausage and in almost any dish using garlic or thyme. Complements lamb dishes, as well as beef and veal. Marjoram blends well with parsley, dill, basil, or thyme. Try it in soups or stews.

Mint

 

Mint

MintMint is the fresh or dried leaf of a perennial herb. There are two important species, Mentha spicata L. (spearmint) and Mentha piperita L. (peppermint). Mint is strong and sweet with a tangy flavor and a cool after taste. Mint jelly served with lamb, sprinkled in peas, or in chocolate desserts. Use mint in salad dressings and zesty marinades. Stir into warmed apple or currant jelly for a quick meat sauce or dessert topping.

Mustard Seed

 

Mustard Seed

Mustard SeedMustard is popular used in many meat dishes or added to sauces. Making prepared mustard is easy with plenty of room for experimentation. To make prepared mustard, mix ground or crushed mustard seeds with equal parts wine, vinegar or water. Add herbs, honey, sugar, garlic, etc. to taste, seal and let sit at room temperature for 2-4 weeks. We stock both brown and yellow mustard seeds, as well as ground yellow mustard also known as mustard flour). Yellow mustard is milder than brown mustard; they are often mixed.

Nutmeg

 

Nutmeg

NutmegNutmeg comes from a large evergreen tree native to Indonesia. Once the fleshy fruit has ripened and dried, it splits open. Inside is the nutmeg seed, enclosed by the scarlet aril, which is dried to become mace. Although usually purchased ground, freshly grated nutmeg is superior in flavor and aroma. Nutmeg is used for flavoring many desserts and sweet dishes, and is also common in spinach, lamb dishes and in sausage. Nutmeg is also good in cheese sauces.

Onion

 

Onion

Onion One of the most popular seasonings available, onion is used in almost every type of dish. Dehydrated onion is useful for flavoring soups, sauces, meats and vegetables or for herb breads. Use granulated free-flowing) or powdered extra-fine)onion for instant flavor, or use minced onion in slow-cooking soups and stews. Minced onion may also be rehydrated in warm water for use in tuna or chicken salads. Use Onions in almost anything except sweets! Dried Onion can be added straight to liquids, but should be rehydrated before being added to drier dishes such as casseroles and stir-fries. Rehydrating them also increases potency. Onions make the perfect foundation for meats, poultry, soups, salads, and stews.

Oregano

 

Oregano

OreganoOregano, another common herb in the mint family, is available in two varieties. Greek, or Mediterranean Oregano is has a sweeter, more delicate flavor. Mexican Oregano is pungent, with a stronger, less sweet flavor. Mexican oregano, less sweet than its Greek counterpart, is perfect for the spicy, cumin flavors of Mexican and Southwest cooking. Great for tacos, fajitas and salsas. Oregano tastes great with tomato, egg, or cheese based foods, and is also a great addition to many lamb, pork, and beef main dishes. Try sautéing aromatic vegetables in olive oil with garlic and Oregano. You can make a savoury sauce with melted butter, lemon juice and a bit of Oregano; drizzle it over grilled fish and poultry. An easy way to accent pasta sauces, salad dressings, and ground meat dishes is with a dusting of crushed Oregano leaves. To release its flavour, crush Oregano by hand or with a mortar and pestle before using it in your recipes. A quick pasta dish can be made by parboiling your favourite pasta, draining, frying it in a pan with a little olive oil and oregano for 2-3 minutes, and adding tuna and mayonnaise mix to it.

Paprika

 

Paprika

PaprikaPaprika is used extensively in Hungarian cuisine, and is popular both for flavoring meats and vegetables and as a brilliant red garnish for cream sauces and egg dishes. Paprika is made from ground red peppers and is often blended with cayenne to create a hotter product. Supplies of Hungarian paprika are currently scarce, but paprika produced in Spain is equally flavorful. Ingredients Hot Paprika): Paprika, cayenne pepper. Paprika is useful as a simple garnish for almost any savoury dish. Combine it with butter, margarine, or oil for a quick baste for fish or poultry. This is especially good on roast turkey. You can even try brushing your roast potatoes with paprika oil. Paprika can be mixed with bread crumbs before sprinkling them over casseroles or vegetables. You can add paprika to almost any dish for instant spice and taste.

Parsley

 

Parsley

ParsleyParsley is grown all over the world, chiefly exported from Egypt. Because it helps bring out the flavor of other herbs, it is used extensively in herb blends such as Herbes de Provence. Parsley is probably the most popular and versatile herb available. Use parsley with any meats or vegetable, and in soups, sauces and stuffings. Stretch home-made pesto and other green sauces by adding a generous amount of Parsley during mixing. Stir Parsley into melted garlic butter for a savoury, yet simple, pasta or steamed vegetable topper. Add directly to liquids, cooked foods, melted butter, and salad dressings for a light spicy touch. Try a nosalt herb blend by combining 1 tablespoon each Parsley Flakes, marjoram, and thyme. Best chop Parsley finely with a knife before adding to food.

Pepper

 

Pepper

PepperPepper is produced in Southeast India. Ripe pepper is allowed to ferment and dry, producing black pepper. Dried unripe berries are green peppercorns. White pepper is black pepper that has been soaked, the black outer husks removed. Pepper is perhaps the most versatile spice available. It is used to flavor almost any meat or vegetable dish, and is even used in some dessert recipes! Coarsely crack Whole Peppercorns with side of a wide chef's knife and rub on to steaks and chops. Create a unique flavour depth in spice cakes, gingerbread's, and ginger cookies with a pinch of finely ground Black Pepper. Use Black Pepper to spark barbecue sauces, meat marinades, and vegetable stirfries. Sprinkle over chowders, cream soups, and tomato and egg dishes. Mix with sour cream or yoghurt for a lively baked potato or vegetable topper. Add Whole Black Peppercorns to soups and stews, and the liquid used to poach seafood, meat, and poultry. Simmer Whole Black Peppercorns in fresh fruit compotes for a delicate, warm spiciness.

Poppy Seeds

 

Poppy Seeds

Poppy SeedsThe ripe seeds of the opium poppy, Poppy seeds are grown in Holland. The tiny, blue/gray seeds are known for their nutty flavor and are used extensively in baking and in Middle Eastern and European cooking. Poppy seeds are used in baked goods and breads, to flavor noodles, and may be crushed and mixed with butter to make poppy seed butter. Poppy seeds have a crunchy texture and a nutty flavor. They're used as a filling in various cakes, pastries and coffee cakes, as a topping for myriad baked goods, in salad dressings and in a variety of cooked dishes — particularly those originating in central Europe, the Middle East and India. Poppy seeds can be purchased whole or ground in most supermarkets. There are also beige and brown poppy seeds, which are more commonly available in Asian or Middle Eastern markets. Because of their high oil content, all poppy seeds are prone to rancidity. They should therefore be stored, airtight, in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.

Red Pepper - Peperoncino

 

Red Pepper - Peperoncino

Peperoncino - Red PepperRed pepper is a pungent, hot powder with a strong bite. Red Pepper is used to achieve the characteristically hot flavor of Mexican, Creole, Cajun, Thai, Szechuan, and Indian cooking. It also is used in chili, Spanish rice, and barbecue sauce as well as meats, salads, and casseroles. Use small amounts of Red Pepper. It is a biting condiment, and the flavour intensifies as it is cooked. Or add a dash of Red Pepper, onion, cheese, and bacon to beaten eggs for scrambled eggs or omelette.

Rosemary - Rosmarino

 

Rosemary - Rosmarino

Rosemary - RosmarinoRosemary has a tealike aroma and a piney flavor. Rosemary is an herb in the mint family. It is a small evergreen shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis, whose 1inch leaves resemble curved pine needles. Rosemary is used primarily in Italy in lamb, pork, chicken, and rabbit dishes. Rosemary also enlivens lighter fish dishes, tomato sauces, and vegetables. Rosemary's assertive flavour blends well with garlic to season lamb roasts, meat stews, and marinades. Rosemary also enlivens lighter fish dishes, tomato sauces, and vegetables. Melt butter with Rosemary to dress freshly steamed red potatoes and peas or a stirfried mixture of zucchini and summer squash. Crush leaves by hand or with a mortar and pestle before using.

Saffron - Zafferano

 

Saffron - Zafferano

SaffronSaffron has a spicy, pungent, and bitter flavor with a sharp and penetrating odor. Saffron is used in French bouillabaisse, Spanish paella, Milanese risotto, and many Middle Eastern dishes. Use it in Italian risottos, Spanish chicken and rice, French seafood stews and Scandinavian sweet breads. Use it in Italian risottos, Spanish chicken and rice, French seafood stews and Scandinavian sweet breads. Saffron has a spicy, pungent, and bitter flavour with a sharp and penetrating odour.

Sage - Salvia

 

Sage - Salvia

SageSage has a fragrant aroma and an astringent but warm flavor. Sage enhances pork, lamb, meats, and sausages. Chopped leaves flavor salads, pickles, and cheese. It is one of the most popular herbs in the United States. Sage is a wonderful flavor enhancer for seafood, vegetables, breadsticks, cornbreads, muffins, and other savory breads. Top swordfish, tuna, steaks, chicken, and turkey pieces with Sagelemon butter. Sage is a wonderful flavour enhancer for seafood, vegetables, breadsticks, cornbreads, muffins, and other savoury breads.

Sassafras

 

Sassafras

SassafrasThe dried and ground leaves are used to make filé powder, a condiment served with some types of gumbo. The roots of Sassafras can be steeped to make tea and were used in the flavoring of traditional root beer until being banned for mass production by the FDA. Laboratory animals that were given oral doses of sassafras tea or sassafras oil that contained large doses of safrole developed permanent liver damage or various types of cancer. In humans liver damage can take years to develop and it may not have obvious signs. Along with commercially available sarsaparilla, sassafras remains an ingredient in use among hobby or microbrew enthusiasts.

Sesame Seed - Sesamo

 

Sesame Seed - Sesamo

Sesame SeedThese cream or black colored seeds from the sesame plant are one of the world's oldest spices. Besides their use in baking, they are the source of oil, ground for tahini paste, and used commercially in margarine production. Black sesame seed is used in addition to or in place of regular white sesame seed for a different, more colorful appearance on breads and vegetable dishes. Sesame Seed has been enjoyed by humans since the dawn of civilisation. It is used in breads, candies, main dishes, as a garnish on pasta and vegetables, and for its oil content.

Summer Savory - Santoreggia

 

Summer Savory - Santoreggia

Summer Savory - Santoreggia Savory has a flavor somewhat like thyme, but is hotter and more peppery. It is a staple in poultry seasonings. Summer savory is commonly used with fresh garden vegetables, to flavor fish, and in sausages and stuffings. It is an excellent addition to vegetable juices. It is the main flavoring in dressing for many fowl, mixed with ground pork and other basic ingredients to create a thick meat dressing known as "cretonade", which is excellent with turkey, goose and duck. It also is used to make stews such as fricot, and in meat pies. Dried, it is usually available year round in local grocery stores and is used in varying proportions, sometimes added to recipes in large generous heaping spoonfuls (such as cretonade), and sometimes more subtlety (as in beans, for which savory has a natural affinity).

Tamarind

 

Tamarind

TamarindThe fruit pulp is edible and popular. The hard green pulp of a young fruit is considered by many to be too sour and acidic, but is often used as a component of savory dishes, as a pickling agent or as a means of making certain poisonous yams in Ghana safe for human consumption. The ripened fruit is considered the more palatable as it becomes sweeter and less sour (acidic) as it matures. It is used in desserts as a jam, blended into juices or sweetened drinks, sorbets, ice-creams and all manner of snack. It is also consumed as a natural laxative.

Tarragon

 

Tarragon

TarragonTarragon, a lovely, aromatic herb, is associated mostly with French cuisine. An ingredient in Herbes de Provence, tarragon is popular in flavored vinegars, mustards and vinaigrette. Used in cream sauces, with vegetables, egg dishes and with chicken. It is an essential ingredient in Bernaise sauce. Tarragon is commonly known as a flavouring is used in pickles, relishes, prepared mustards, and sauces. Tarragon also goes well with fish, meat, soups and stews, and is often used in tomato and egg dishes. Tarragon adds distinctive flavour to sauces.

Thyme

 

Thyme

ThymeOf the more than 100 varieties of thyme, garden thyme is the most widely recognized for culinary use. Popular in cooking throughout the Mediterranean, thyme is available in leaf form, or ground for use in sauces. Thyme is used to flavor soups, stocks and stews, and is an essential ingredient in bouquet garni. Thyme is also good with vegetables, and adds excellent flavor to meat dishes cooked in wine and garlic. Thyme is often included in seasoning blends for poultry and stuffing and also commonly used in fish sauces, chowders, and soups. It goes well with lamb and veal as well as in eggs, custards, and croquettes. Thyme often is paired with tomatoes.

Turmeric - Curcuma

 

Turmeric - Curcuma

TurmericTurmeric is used commercially to color mustards, butter and cheese. Its culinary uses are best know in the East, particularly India and China. Turmeric is used as a natural yellow coloring for soups and sauces, in rice dishes, and curry. Makes a nice garnish for light colored sauces. Turmeric is a necessary ingredient of curry powder. It is used extensively in Indian dishes, including lentil and meat dishes, and in Southeast Asian cooking. Turmeric is routinely added to mustard blends and relishes. It also is used in place of saffron to provide colour and flavour.

Vanilla

 

Vanilla

Vanilla Vanilla powder is made by spraying high strength extract onto a malto-dextrin base. the base is then dried and powdered, preserving the vanilla flavor in dry form. Use vanilla powder in place of vanilla extract for recipes that should have no color. It is a good alternative to clear extract, which has much of its flavor filtered out. It is also popular used to flavor coffee or as a sprinkle on French toast. Vanilla is one of the most popular flavourings in the world. It is used in flavouring most desserts, including ice cream, custard, cake, candy, and pudding. Vanilla is also used to enhance the flavour of beverages and sauces.

Wasabi Powder

 

Wasabi Powder

Wasabi Powder Ingredients: Horseradish powder, mustard. Wasabi is a fiery blend of Japanese horseradish and mustard. It is mixed with equal parts warm water into a thick paste, then served with fish or sushi. Wasabi is a variety of green horseradish grown only in Japan; and the only place you will find it fresh. Wasabi powder has a sharp flavor that's a bit hotter than the familiar white horseradish. Wasabi powder provides a nice change of pace from chiles. It provides heat, but has more of an herbal overtone and dissapates more quickly. You can also use it as a substitute for Dijon mustard, or as a flavoring in home-made mustards. Combine equal parts of wasabi powder and warm water to make wababi paste, similar to the familiar sushi accompaniment. You can also make an easy wasabi cream sauce in the same manner, just add warm cream until you reach the desired consistency. Wasabi is a great compliment to almost any asian dish. Try adding a a little bit to your mashed potatoes, or mix it in with some mayonaise for a sandwich.


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